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Your Resume Must Tell Employers What They Want to Know
Date created: 03/08/2009

Your Resume Must Tell Employers What They Want to Know

Author: Accuro Resumes

When you attempt to craft a resume, there is always the danger that you will fall in love with your own creation. While it stands to reason that you would want to produce a resume that reads well to you, your opinion doesn't count as much as a prospective employer's viewpoint.

As a result, it is vitally important that you turn out a resume that tells employers exactly what they want to know. If your resume is deficient in any way...if it fails to inform a recruiting manager where you worked, how long you worked there, what your educational background is, what skills you possess, and your general qualifications for a specific position...your resume will quickly end up in the waste bin.

Don't Depend on the Interview to Make Up for Problems With Your Resume

A number of job-seekers are satisfied with producing a resume that's less than perfect because they hold out the hope that they can make up for their resume's flaws through a stellar performance during a job interview. The problem with this line of thinking is that, unless your resume is top-notch, it is unlikely that you will be selected for any interview at all. Therefore, it pays to devote time and attention to fine-tuning your resume so that it meets the needs of prospective employers.

Put Yourself in the Employer's Place

In order to write an effective resume, you need to put yourself in the place of the hiring manager. The employer's eyes may be glazing over from all the resumes he or she has had to review. As a result, the employer is probably skimming through the stack looking for potential employees who fit some key criteria: the criteria being that they will perform the job effectively and efficiently; they will benefit the company; and they will be dedicated to their position.

Be Sure to Cover the Basics

While it is certainly wise to make your resume as brief as you possibly can, it is critically important that you include the basic information a prospective employer wants to know. You might be surprised at the fact that a number of job-seekers forget to include their e-mail addresses or cell phone numbers—two key ways for employers to get in touch with them. Also, be sure to include your snail-mail address, in case the employer needs you to fill out an application or a survey.

Your resume should include a complete job history (at least, post-college), information about skills you have that are applicable to the job you're applying for, a list of the degrees you've earned and the colleges, universities, and relevant training programs you've attended, and your references. A prospective employer wants to know what your references have to say about you—he or she doesn't want to take the time to call you and track down names and phone numbers at the last minute. The more complete the information you provide about your references, the better. Providing reference information as an addendum to your resume is a positive option.

Indicate Why Your Candidacy is Special

Once you've covered the basics, it's highly important that you provide the employer with information that will distinguish your candidacy from the rest of the job applicants. If your resume is overly broad in focus, it will not attract the interest of a corporate recruiter. Instead, consider narrowing your focus by including information about special skill sets you possess, leadership roles you've held, and evidence of your team-building abilities. This information, like the rest of the information on your resume, must be presented in a clear, concise manner—otherwise, the employer will simply move onto the next resume.

Don't Forget the Profile

Employers are definitely interested in your key accomplishments, evidence of your professionalism and your pursuit of excellence. These achievements can be easily encapsulated in a profile section at the beginning of your resume. Recruiters can read through the profile quickly, giving them an immediate impression of your suitability for the position that's been advertised.

What Employers Don't Want to Know

It is also important to pay some attention to what employers don't want to know—or, at least, what they would prefer not to read on your resume. While each prospective employer is unique, there are certain common viewpoints that most share when it comes to resume appraisal.

In an effort to set themselves apart from the pack of other job applicants, a number of job-seekers make the mistake of making their resumes "too personal." For instance, one individual who was seeking a position in government tried to portray himself in a unique light by including the names of his three dogs. Rather than making him appear intriguing, his decision to include dog news on his resume proved to be a deal-ender.

Also, for the most part, your resume does not need to explain in detail why you left a particular position. You can leave the discussion of that for the eventual job interview. It is far better to talk about the pitfalls in your job history in person rather than to try to explain them on paper.

The Intangibles

There are certain intangibles that employers want to know about you—information that you can convey in your resume. For instance, by proofreading your resume carefully and making sure that it is error-free, you are showing a prospective employer that you have a keen eye for detail. By presenting your resume in a professional, easy-to-read manner, you are demonstrating that you have excellent written communication skills. By listing your community and volunteer activities, you show an employer that you have a sense of commitment to bettering the world around you. These intangibles can often determine whether or not you are called in for an interview—or whether your resume is kept on file—never to be seen again.

This article was written by the certified professional resume writers of Resume Service. The writers at AccuroResumes will help create a perfect professional resume suited to your best needs. See why thousands of people are discovering the benefits of a perfect professional resume written by AccuroResumes.com. You are guaranteed to be 100% satisfied with your new, professional resume or, your money back. Reproductions of this article are encouraged, but must include a link pointing to http://www.AccuroResumes.com/.

About the Author:
The writers at AccuroResumes will help create a perfect professional resume suited to your best needs. See why thousands of people are discovering the benefits of a perfect professional resume written by AccuroResumes.com. You are guaranteed to be 100% satisfied with your new, professional resume or, your money back. Reproductions of this article are encouraged, but must include a link pointing to http://www.AccuroResumes.com/.

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - Your Resume Must Tell Employers What They Want to Know


7 Ways A More Aggressive Job Search Produces Better Results
Date created: 03/08/2009

7 Ways A More Aggressive Job Search Produces Better Results

Author: Leslie Kearney

Is your job search producing lackluster results at best? Don't settle for a job search that just creeps along! Instead, consider taking a more aggressive approach to take fuller advantage of high performing tactics.

You need to know that an aggressive job search techniques are unconventional, often radical, and always strategic. And they work! They outperform traditional job search strategies in 7 key ways:

(1) Make your aggressive tactics proactive: If you have been in the job market very long this is the way it is typically done. Traditionally you submit your resume and cover letter, then passively sit back and wait for a call. Hopefully to an interview. But in an aggressive job search, you set the pace for your campaign through weekly networking calls or emails. These should include weekly follow-up contacts with hiring managers that you have sent your email and cover letter to. These will include both posted or anticipated job openings. By making 10 - 15 such calls each week, you can increase the pace of your results. And affect your search exponentially.

(2) Target your aggressive job search tactics: If you spend all your time only seeking online job postings, then you're missing out on all kinds of highly targeted job leads. Instead focus on specific industries, employers, geographic areas, and position types to help you magnify the number of interviews and job offers you receive. Don't make the mistake of applying for everything you see. ­Doing that may make you feel productive, but such a shot-gun approach to job searching ultimately fails to help you secure the position you desire. For several years I was in sales and the companies I worked for pushed cold calling. I hate cold calling because it is unproductive. So I focused in applying the above techniques to sales. They worked. I was always way ahead of my peers who spent their time cold calling.

(3) Aggressive job search tactics are consistent: If you sit back and wait for the interesting jobs to show up on job boards and in ads, you are guaranteeing failure or at best prolonging the agony of job searching.

If you submit 8-10 resumes in some weeks, say, and only 1-2 in others, then you are setting yourself up for failure. However by leveraging an aggressive job search will enable you to consistently submit 25 or more resumes per week, which in turn will produce a regular series of job interviews. And a series of interviews boosts your odds of receiving one or more job offers. That’s the plan after all, isn’t it?

(4) Aggressive job search tactics are customized: No matter how you figure, a job search is something of a numbers game just as it is in the sales scenario I mentioned above. The philosophy behind traditional job search tactics of blasting your resume to hundreds of employers all at once, is a job is a job, is a job. But that leaves no room for you to target specific industry segments or position types. A more aggressive job search technique will stress your individuality by weaving your personality and career-related values into your resume, cover letter, and interview responses that boosts the odds that hiring managers looking for someone like you will actually find you. If you read through the articles on our website ResumeHelpBlog.com you will find that is our basic philosophy because all jobs are not created equal.

(5) Aggressive job search tactics are free or low-cost: If you took advantage of all the job search offers available on the Internet, you could easily spend hundreds and possibly thousands of dollars, and still see little to no positive results. The good news, though, is that by using an aggressive job search technique by their very nature either free or extremely low-cost. Many HR consulting firms who work with job seekers will often stress that they give you hundreds of hiring employer names to contact (that's how they justify their high fees). Did you know that you can access that same information on the Internet for free? You will be surprised at what you can find on the Internet, or maybe not surprised at all.

(6) An aggressive job search tactic will restore balance to your life: Many things in life output and effort, yet overlook the power of automation. Searching for a job is no different. By taking advantage of automated functions in your pc's software and on online job search tools, you could save time every week. Life is too short, to spend all your time hunting down job leads. Enhance the quality of your life by automating your job search in every way possible.

(7) And finally aggressive job search tactics will penetrate the Hidden Job Market: One of the greatest weaknesses of traditional job search methods is that they focus on the Visible Job Market, or those jobs that are both currently available and known outside the hiring organization. A major company where my daughter works hires that way and pays a bonus for referrals. My daughter has helped several friends find work with this firm and in the process has pocketed several hundred dollars in bonuses. Almost three quarters of all jobs are never advertised in the Visible Job Market. Most companies would prefer to promote from within or hire from a referral of a trusted employee. So what does a smart job seeker do? They tell everyone they know that they are available. You have to ­leverage the power of the aggressive job search tactics to penetrate the Hidden Job Market as much as possible.

You don't have to wait for a hot economy to land the job you really want. By taking advantage of as many aggressive job search tactics as possible, you will dramatically shorten your job search while boosting the interviews and offers you land.

About the Author:

Leslie Kearney is the owner of http://www.ResumeHelpBlog.com a site committed to helping you get the perfect job. We offer resume writing tips, links to the best professional resume writers, job links and more!

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - 7 Ways A More Aggressive Job Search Produces Better Results


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