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Search and Apply for Jobs Online
Date created: 28/04/2010
Search and Apply for Jobs Online

Search and Apply for Jobs Online
By Mamta Papneja

The Internet has created a latest and effective way to search for jobs online that has made job search easier than ever before. When it comes to using the internet to find a new opportunity, one can have a number of options. The two most popular options are visiting the online websites of companies and visiting career search websites. One of the advantages of using online career search websites and company websites to find vacancies is that one can apply for those openings instantly. Many career search websites are designed to allow searching for a opportunity in a specific industry as well as search by a specific location.

One can search vacancies online through various online job sites which are offering people to get their dream opportunity just by sitting at home. Openings can be searched through various and different online job sites so that the job seeker has many different options from each and every site. Online placement sites help the job seekers to find a good suitable vacancy. Companies also post their vacancies to online job sites irrespective of the region they are located. Free classified ad-sites are visited by people to find vacancies for them. The openings are regularly advertised in classified-ad sites to get a suitable candidate at least possible expense. These sites are visited by freshers to locate some fresher openings for them. The greatest advantage of these free classified job-sites is that they are useful for advertiser and searcher both.

The job search engine provides the applicant with regular updates regarding new jobs. To get the maximum output out of the online job search engine, one should make sure that the resume is professionally made and clearly mentions the kind of jobs the person is looking for and in which place. Online job search engines provide the applicant with more than enough job results as well as the company address, contact number or email address and a detailed description of the nature of the job and the procedure of selection. It gives a person all the information that he or she can possibly need to apply and go through a job selection procedure.

One needs to identify the best job search site from the extensive and vast resources presented on the internet. It is important to pick a site that allows a job seeker to not only post the resume, but also search jobs that are based on locations and keywords. To conclude, one can say that searching and applying for jobs online is a very practical and convenient way.

Get more latest jobs India check out angclassifieds.com and check out all part time jobs online in India.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Mamta_Papneja
http://EzineArticles.com/?Search-and-Apply-for-Jobs-Online&id=4144368


Let Your Dreams Lead You to a New Career
Date created: 23/04/2010
Let Your Dreams Lead You to a New Career

Let Your Dreams Lead You to a New Career

Everyone has dreams, but all too often they let these dreams fall to the wayside and end up wondering years later whatever happened to all of the dreams that they had when they were younger. This doesn't have to be the case, however; it's possible to not only hold on to your dreams but also to make them come true by letting them influence your life and your career choices. Instead of simply saying that they're nothing more than dreams, you can make a conscious decision to embrace those dreams and see them through to the end. Not only will you get to see your dreams become real, but you will find that by letting them influence the work that you do and the direction that your life takes you will be much more satisfied with your life's work in general.

Recognizing Your Dreams
In order to live your dreams and let them lead you to your dream career, you will first need to realize exactly what your dreams are. Take some time to consider the things that you want and what you would like to see come to pass in your life; these aren't the fanciful obsessions that you might get from time to time that will pass in a matter of days or weeks, but are instead the lifelong ambitions that you've held on to ever since you were introduced to the concept. Look into your heart, see what's really important to you and what you would like most of all to see happen in your life, and that is where you will find your dreams.

Relating Your Dreams to Your Work
When you start seriously thinking about your dreams and comparing them to your life as it is right now, you might wonder how you're ever going to be able to reach your dreams from the place that you are in life. Look at your job and the things that you do, and try and imagine what it would take in order to reach your dreams from this starting point. For some people this might be easy, and you might have been living out portions of your dreams without even realizing it for quite some time. You may notice that your volunteer work is what you love.

For others this could be a rather difficult task, however, since they may have taken the job that was needed at the time and then never really got a chance to start working toward their dreams again. Consider where in your career you are, and whether it's possible to get where you want to be within that same career path. If it's not, then you should start researching different career options until you find the one that will take you to your dreams and help you make them come true.

Using Your Work to Follow Your Dreams
When you can see yourself reaching your dreams from the career that you have, then it's time to start putting your energy into following your career path to the point where you can reach your dreams. Set goals for yourself and for your career, and keep trying after every setback until those goals are reached. It might not always be easy, but once you have the career that's right for you making it to your dreams will seem to be a natural progression.




Source: http://www.articlecircle.com/ - Free Articles Directory

About the Author

Contact Career Coaching Connections at 248-390-0781 and visit http://www.c3livingthedream.com. Cindy Swiantek has provided coaching and instruction for several hundred professionals, assisting them in planning and executing successful career transition. She brings her own experiences from personally making the transition from employee to executive in the automotive industry. Her passion for assisting others is contagious!

Research and Be Prepared
Date created: 07/12/2009
In the ideal situation, the interviewer and the interviewee are equally interested in finding a perfect fit. Look out for yourself. Ask hard questions about work conditions, drawbacks, and low points. If asked tactfully and backed up with research, well-directed questions of this sort won't offend a responsible interviewer. After all, a happy employee is going to be more productive than someone who hates his job.

But if you choose unwisely the first time, don't worry -- jobs are no longer forever. People change careers nowadays about as often as their hairstyles. Chances are, even the person who interviews you, if he or she hasn't been living in a cave with blind fish, will understand that you probably won't be with the company for life. Gone are the days of the 1950s "company man" who signed up after college and stayed on until he retired. Nevertheless, choosing a job and career right the first time saves a lot of time and angst.

Vault.com offers insider company research on thousands of top employers. You can also fill out an employer survey on Vault and quality to win $500.

The following are some questions you'll want to answer, either by yourself prior to the interview or during the interview, to avoid ending up in the wrong position:

What are the hours?

If your research hasn't revealed this already, you should ask if a job advertised as 40 hours a week really takes 50 or 60 hours a week, or more. You have a right to know how much you'll be working and should protect yourself by asking in the interview whether or not this is truly a 40-hour-a-week job. Interviewers should be honest with you about this; it's information you need to know in order to make a good decision. If you're going to be slammed with work from nine to nine every day, it might not be worth it for you.

Pay?

Be aware that overeagerness to ask about salary can make you look unprofessional. Asking about salary while calling up to schedule an interview is a bad idea. The best time to ask about salary is after you've gotten the job, but before you've accepted. Even if money is your prime motivation, wait till late in the interview to ask money questions.

Still, salary and other benefits are important. Before you go in for an interview, think about how much you need to make to live comfortably, and how much you think you deserve to make, given the responsibilities and your qualifications. You can find pay information at specific companies with Vault company research.

What type of work will I be doing?

Before you go in for an interview, think about which type of work environment suits you best. As we saw earlier, different corporations develop different attitudes. The atmosphere on the floor of the New York Stock exchange is very different from a public library in a small town. Some jobs require you to work with a team in order to produce a final product, while you'll work in solitude in others. It's your responsibility to find the environment that best suits you.

How long will I be here?

Before the interview, you'll also wish to think about your commitment to the job. The interviewer will be concerned about how long you will be able to stay with them. Are you looking for summer employment between school terms, for a six-month experience, a three-month internship, or a lifelong career path? In establishing a career, consider that anything under a year does not constitute a valid work experience to some employers. In many jobs it takes six months just to get up to speed.

Are there walls?

When you go in for the interview, be alert to the work environment, both physical and human. Pay attention to the way the company gets its work done. Imagine yourself coming into that building every day. Do people in the office wear Armani or Levis, DKNY or Dickies? Do they crowd into cubicles or kick back in plush, well-ferned offices? Is there a backslapping, good-ol'-boy, "see the game last night, Joe?" feel to the place? Do the workers seem happy or do they wander round the office like zombies? Are there stains on the carpet, interesting art on the walls? If you look at the interview experience as an opportunity to gather as much information as you can about the company, you'll have plenty of factors to sift through when it's time to make a decision.

Big fish in small pond or cog in machine?

How big a company do you want to work for? Will you be more comfortable as a prominent player in an office where everyone knows one another, or as a single, relatively unnoticed cog in a massive corporate machine? Smaller companies are more likely to offer flexible hours and vacation policies, and they may offer more opportunities for immediate, diverse, and substantive involvement. In addition, a smaller company may be a growing company. It can be exciting to ride a company as it grows, to watch and participate in the formation of its culture and lingo. Smaller companies also tend to suffer less from bothersome bureaucracies, so your ideas have a better chance of immediate implementation.

By the same token, it's difficult to hide in a small company. Everyone will soon realize if you're not producing. It may be more difficult for you to take vacation, or even a long lunch. Small companies also tend to pay less and can't offer the benefits of a larger firm. And especially in these consolidation-crazy times, they're somewhat more susceptible to buy-outs and bankruptcy than a big, established operation. Fortune 500 companies, on the other hand, can usually afford higher salaries than smaller places can. They also offer more comprehensive benefits, and may offer a wider variety of potential places to live.

In the interview process, employees at small companies understand that they don't have the name recognition of bigger places and won't expect you to know as much about them. This is why it's an especially good idea when interviewing with a smaller place, to find out who they are and what they do. Make sure you thoroughly check their web site, if they have one. At least research the industry in which the company's involved if you can't find anything more specific. Also, Vault.com's company research provides insights into workplace culture at major employers.


Avoiding Resume Elimination at the Initial Scanning Scan is Vital
Date created: 24/08/2009

Avoiding Resume Elimination at the Initial Scanning Scan is Vital

Author: Accuro Resumes

The popularity of the book "Blink" underscores the importance of first impressions in any business dealing. The premise of the book is that many decisions are, in fact, snap judgments—but that those judgments often hold true. Given this fact of modern business life, you'll want to do everything possible not to torpedo your job application from the start.

Obviously, the first step in any successful job hunt is sending a resume—either by e-mail or by snail-mail. You want a resume that is complete, yet concise...factual and not fraudulent...impressive and not insufferable. In addition, you'll want to craft a resume that will not end up in the reject pile as soon as it lands on an executive's desk.

It is critical that you compose a resume that can withstand an initial "scan," whether that scan is by human eyes or electronic ones. While it may not be possible to make your resume "scan-proof," you can certainly increase your chances of getting your resume past the initial scan.
The Importance of the Scan

As a job seeker, you might be wondering why so much emphasis is placed on resume scanning to begin with. In order to understand this, you must place yourself in the role of the employer or recruiting manager. He or she has to work through a pile of resumes that may be 300 resumes-high. Filling a particular position may be just one of dozens of other things on the daily to-do list. As a result, time is precious to the hiring executive, and he or she must do everything possible to make the process as time-efficient as possible.
The First Look

While you may have poured your heart and soul into your resume...working for hours to perfect it...you need to understand that an employer will spend little time scanning it. In fact, he or she will probably spend only about ten seconds looking at your resume!

During that incredibly short period of time, it's important that you grab his or her attention. In many cases, that means clearly stating your career objective at the beginning of your resume...making your applicable job skills stand out from the text...providing a coherent history of your experience, along with any special honors you have received. Keep in mind that the employer is looking for those positions you've held and those job skills you've acquired that are directly relevant to the position being offered. If you fill your resume with inconsequential material...information that doesn't have anything to do with your qualifications for a specific job...your resume will, in all likelihood, be quickly discarded to make room for those resumes that fit the bill.

If your resume is long and wieldy...if it is difficult to read and nearly impossible to follow...if it is poorly formatted...or if it contains spelling errors and grammatical mistakes...it will not survive this initial scan.
The Finer Points

In addition to these general considerations, there are some finer points that need to be considered when you draft your resume. For instance, you have to consider the fact that a recruiter will be looking at your resume to see if your latest work experience matches the type of work you'd be doing in the position that's advertised. If you are applying for a job as a television producer and you have not produced a show in ten years, you'll probably have trouble winning that coveted TV news producing job.

Next, the hiring manager will also look to see what kinds of companies you've worked for. In other words, if your resume reflects a history of working for Fortune 500 companies, you have a greater chance of landing another Fortune 500 job. Like attracts like—and if you've been working for major corporations, the hiring manager at a large company is far more likely to hire you.

The recruiter will also look to see if you have a demonstrated record of achievement. For instance, does your resume show a history of promotions? Has your work won prestigious awards, either at the local or national level? Has your work been recognized for special honors at your current place of employment? The more honors you list in your resume, the more likely it will pass through that initial scan with ease.

Finally, a number of employers are greatly interested in where you received your education. An Ivy League credential can work magic during the job application process. In some cases, an employer may be more inclined to invite you in for an interview if you both attended the same college or completed the same graduate degree program. While experience usually trumps education during the initial scan, that's not to say that the education section of your resume is not important.
When Computers Do the Scanning

In this technological age, it is highly important that you produce a resume that can withstand high-tech scrutiny. Since a number of employers rely on specialized software that screens resumes for specific words and phrases, you want to customize your resume as much as possible to the position you're applying for. If the position is in sales and you've had extensive sales experience, be sure to mention the word "sales" throughout your resume. If the advertised job involves supervising other employees, make sure that your supervisory experience is indicated extensively within the text of your work history. Before you write your resume, you may want to brainstorm, producing a list of words and phrases that would be associated with the position you're seeking. That way, you can be sure to insert all relevant words into the text of your resume, increasing the chances that you will be called in for an interview.
Put Your Resume to the Scan Test

If you are not sure how your resume would survive a scan, it's a good idea to test it with one of your colleagues. Have an associate whose opinion you value take a ten-second look at your resume. In all likelihood, any missteps you've made will literally jump off the page, giving you all the information you need for a quick and effective rewrite.

This article was written by the certified professional resume writers of Resume Services(http://www.AccuroResumes.com/). The writers at AccuroResumes will help create a perfect professional resume suited to your best needs. See why thousands of people are discovering the benefits of a perfect professional resume written by AccuroResumes.com. You are guaranteed to be 100% satisfied with your new, professional resume or, your money back. Reproductions of this article are encouraged, but must include a link pointing to http://www.AccuroResumes.com/.

About the Author:
The writers at AccuroResumes will help create a perfect professional resume suited to your best needs. See why thousands of people are discovering the benefits of a perfect professional resume written by AccuroResumes.com. You are guaranteed to be 100% satisfied with your new, professional resume or, your money back. Reproductions of this article are encouraged, but must include a link pointing to http://www.AccuroResumes.com/.

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - Avoiding Resume Elimination at the Initial Scanning Scan is Vital


The Right Keywords Can Get Your Resume Noticed Among the Harshest Competition
Date created: 24/08/2009

The Right Keywords Can Get Your Resume Noticed Among the Harshest Competition

Author: Accuro Resumes

It's often been said that saying the right words at the right time is the key to success in the business world. If you have a line in your presentation that really captures attention...or if you say something particularly clever in a job interview...you may be able to achieve a career high you never dreamed possible.

It's also no secret that a resume needs to be worded quite carefully if it is to accomplish the job applicant's hoped-for results. While you're drafting the wording for your career highlights, job duties, and other essential information for your resume, you should give some serious attention to keywords.
How the High-Tech Revolution Changed Resume Reading

There was a time when employers took a stack of resumes that had been handed to them by their secretaries and proceeded to read through them, carefully laying aside those resumes that featured applicants that appeared to be suitable to the companies' needs. Of course, this was a painstaking, time-intensive process, and a manager who was bored or tired might inadvertently misclassify a resume in the process of getting through the stack.

However, with the advent of sophisticated technology, the resume-reading process has changed dramatically. A number of human resource executives note that such changes were inevitable, given the large volume of resumes that are routinely delivered to a manager's inbox. If hundreds of resumes are submitted for a given job, a corporate headhunter must find some way to scale that paper mountain in order to find the right candidate. As a result, an increasing number of employers are digitizing the resumes that pour into their offices. The documents can then be placed into keyword-searchable databases in order to isolate those resumes that contain "the magic words."
Getting Noticed

One resume-writing expert now estimates that more than 80 percent of all resumes are searched for job-related keywords. Given the fact that both Fortune 500 companies and smaller firms are now routinely engaging in keyword searches, it only makes sense to make your resume as keyword-attractive as possible.

You will need to craft your resume so that it contains the keywords that a manager is searching for with regard to a particular position. While job titles often serve as keywords, you cannot change the titles you've held, so you should consider focusing instead on job skills. If you're applying for an IT job, for instance, you'll want to list specific technological skills in your resume. You'll also want to be sure to include the names of software and hardware that you've worked with (This is probably true, even if you are not applying for a job that does not require a BA in computer science).

If you are searching for a position as a business executive, the term "Fortune 500" can be an incredibly helpful keyword to have in your resume. Some large firms recruit exclusively from other large corporations. Therefore, if you do not include "Fortune 500" in the text of your resume, you could be missing out on an incredible opportunity.
Key Things to Consider About Keyword Placement

It's highly important to recognize the fact that including critical keywords in your resume copy is not enough to secure an interview for the job you desire. You'll also need to place keywords appropriately within the text. At one time, resume-writing experts recommended placing a simple list of keywords at the beginning of your resume—but that conventional thinking doesn't seem to hold true anymore. While you should try to place keywords near the beginning of your resume rather than at the tail end, it's best if you incorporate keywords throughout the body of your document.

By crafting your resume in this way, you will achieve two important goals: 1.) keyword-searching software will pick up all relevant keywords within your text and 2.) you'll be able to attract and hold the attention of a company manager who might be bored by a long list of keywords headlining your resume.

Also, don't forget about the often-overlooked synonym. While you can make an educated guess about the types of keywords an employer is looking for, you're not a mind reader. Therefore, in addition to a generous use of one of your keyword favorites, be sure to include synonyms for the word as well. By following this advice, it's more likely that your resume will have the keywords the employer is actually searching for.
How Many Keywords Are Enough?

Once you begin the process of selecting keywords, it's imperative that you make sure that you include a sufficient number of keywords in your resume. One Internet resume expert recommends aiming for 25 to 35 keywords, and also suggests that you include as many variations as possible. In this way, you can work to make your resume as keyword-rich as possible—without making it a dull read.

Once you've devised a keyword-intensive resume, think of the document as being subject to change. After all, in your conversations with your colleagues, you may discover that new keywords have come to the fore in your field. It's also a wise idea to refresh your resume for each position you're applying to...since different companies—and different jobs—may require a different list of keywords. A highly customized resume is often a successful resume.
Should You Avoid Certain Keywords?

While you may think that you've developed a comprehensive list of resume keywords, you might be wondering if there are certain keywords that should never see the light of day in your resume. The quick answer to this is an emphatic "yes!" When posting your resume on the Internet, you'll want to steer clear of those keywords that might be associated with the type of job you don't want. For instance, if you don't want a position selling insurance, it might be wise for you to avoid the word "sales" in your resume if at all possible. Avoiding keywords is not deceptive—it's simply a good marketing concept.
An Eye-Catching Resume

By selecting the proper keywords, you should be able to create a resume that truly sets you apart from your competitors, garnering the types of job interviews you're looking for. A resume that has its fair share of winning keywords can usually pass the keyword-searching test, getting you one step closer to the position you deserve.

This article was written by the certified professional resume writers of Resume Writing(http://www.AccuroResumes.com/). The writers at AccuroResumes will help create a perfect professional resume suited to your best needs. See why thousands of people are discovering the benefits of a perfect professional resume written by AccuroResumes.com. You are guaranteed to be 100% satisfied with your new, professional resume or, your money back. Reproductions of this article are encouraged, but must include a link pointing to http://www.AccuroResumes.com/.

About the Author:
The writers at AccuroResumes will help create a perfect professional resume suited to your best needs. See why thousands of people are discovering the benefits of a perfect professional resume written by AccuroResumes.com. You are guaranteed to be 100% satisfied with your new, professional resume or, your money back. Reproductions of this article are encouraged, but must include a link pointing to http://www.AccuroResumes.com/.

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - The Right Keywords Can Get Your Resume Noticed Among the Harshest Competition


Dont Get Up
Date created: 24/08/2009

Don't Get Up: Ten Stay-at-home Careers

Author: Kelli Smith

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), nearly 20 percent of all employed people did some work at home as part of their primary job in 2007. While working at home used to be associated exclusively with entrepreneurs, many companies are also allowing employees to work from home. Here are ten examples of office work that workers can now complete from home.

#1: Virtual Customer Service
Household names like J. Crew and Walgreens are scaling back on-site call centers in favor of home-based customer agents. Applicants contract through third-party agencies, including Sci@home, Reps for Rent, and Working Solutions. The BLS expects 25 percent job growth from 2006 to 20016. In 2007, customer service representatives earned a median annual salary of $29,040.

#2: Virtual Concierge
In an age of fifty- and sixty-hour workweeks for swamped professionals, errands large and small have been outsourced to home-based virtual concierges at firms like VIPdesk.com. Employees plan parties, schedule doctor's appointments. Some of the stranger requests include booking sunset helicopter rides and drafting wedding toasts! According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, administrative assistants made a median annual salary of $38,640.

#3: Blogging
For the homebody with a gift for words and a wealth of ideas, the blogosphere can provide an excellent job opportunity. Blogs--short for "Weblogs"--are user-generated Web journals on subjects from movies to politics. Bloggers who capture a significant audience can earn money by posting advertisements on their pages. In 2005, online marketing firm USWeb, paid bloggers $5 to mention a company or link to its site, while Google's AdSense program pays bloggers on a per-click basis.

#4: Public Relations
For those experienced in promotions, event-planning, marketing communications, or contract management, PR rep work has moved out of the high-rise and into the home. PR management firms like Perkett PR, PartnerCentric allow their reps to work from home. Employment of PR specialists is expected to grow by 18 percent from 2006 to 2016. Median annual earnings for PR specialists were $49,800 in May 2007.

#5: Online Tutor
Talented students and recent graduates of accredited universities with demonstrated proficiencies in math, science, and English can turn money by tutoring online. Users of online tutors range from fourth-graders to college student. For instructing via email, online tutors can log up to thirty hours per week at over ten dollars an hour.

#6: Writing and Editing
For wordsmiths looking to conquer worlds beyond blogging dollars, writing and editing for online and print publication can be an excellent work-from-home job. Sites like Associated Content or Helium pay writers for original articles. More experienced writers can freelance for print publications. Newcomers can find writer's guidelines and tips for breaking through with original submissions on the websites of favorite periodicals, and contact information on mastheads. Experienced writers can make anywhere from twenty cents to a dollar per word. Some stay-at-home writers specialize in resumes, brochures, and proofreading documents.

#7: Translating
A global economy requires multilingual communication. Freelance translators are finding home-based jobs through companies like Welocalize and Language Translation, Inc. Prospective employees take a written test (and sign a nondisclosure agreement when sensitive source materials are involved). The most popular translations include English to Japanese, Spanish, French, and German. The BLS expects employment of translators to increase 24 percent by 2016. Median annual earnings for translators and interpreters were $37,490 in May 2007.

#8: Assistant Work
Many small business owners and busy executives don't have the office space to employ a full-time assistant. Virtual assistants--who handle payroll, bookkeeping, correspondence, and travel arrangements by phone and email--provide an ideal solution. Median annual earnings for executive secretaries and administrative assistants were $38,640 in May 2007.

#9: Transcribing
For the sake of diligent record keeping, television shows, lectures, and public addresses are often transcribed into text. The typically job requires solid language skills, an attuned listening ear, and lightning-fast typing speed. Audio transcriptionists can earn over $20,000 per year.

#10: Medical Transcription and Coding
Definitely not for beginners in the field, medical transcription and coding was once confined to doctors' offices--for confidentiality's sake. Experienced medical transcriptionists, however, are sometimes allowed to work from home. The requirements, besides extensive professional training, are high-speed Internet access, a headset, and a foot pedal. Employment of medical transcriptionists is projected to grow 14 percent by 2016. In May 2007, median annual earnings for medical transcriptionists were $31,250.

While working from home has its benefits--no long commute, stifling dress-codes, or hovering managers--it's not always a walk in the park, and there are rules to be followed. Tory Johnson, co-author of Will Work From Home, recommends that home based workers keep regular schedules, create a dedicated space for home-based work, and making occasional face-time at the office.

About the Author:

Edu411.org is a career education directory for finding colleges and universities, training schools, and technical institutes. For more information about careers, online education and campus based career programs, please visit us at http://www.edu411.org">www.Edu411.org" target="_blank">www.Edu411.org">http://www.edu411.org">www.Edu411.org.

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - Don't Get Up: Ten Stay-at-home Careers


Out On The Pavement? Could Be Good Time To Hit The Books
Date created: 24/08/2009

Out On The Pavement? Could Be Good Time To Hit The Books

Author: Kelli Smith

The economy is in a tailspin. Every day, it seems, more employers in more industries announce massive layoffs. If you are fearful of losing your job in this recession or if you already have, it may be a good time to consider going back to school to earn an advanced degree in your field or study for a new career.

The rule-of-thumb has always been the more education you have, the less likely you are to be unemployed, and the more you can earn over the life of your career. In this down economy, the return on your investment in further education could be shorter than in good times.

Weather the Storm by Returning to School
This is a particularly good recession to return to school because most experts are predicting it may take the economy two or more years to recover--enough time for you to complete a number of different degree programs, including some master's degrees. By the time you get that diploma in hand, employers could be hiring again and looking for someone with your newly acquired, up-to-date skills.

You Can Find Ways to Finance Your Return to the Classroom
Financing your studies may not be as hard as you fear. If you were laid off and received a lump sum severance, you could put that money toward tuition. Many community colleges are waiving tuition for those who recently were laid off. Also, the economic stimulus package that President Obama is pushing through Congress would increase spending for financial aid making it easier to obtain. Taking courses online can also save commuting time and expense. In the end, be sure to take advantage of any grants and scholarships for which you are eligible.

Which Direction to Follow?
Do you want to continue in the same field that you have been working in or is this a good time to start over in a new direction? The answer depends on several factors: how happy were you in your job and how much room for advancement is there in that industry? Is your chosen profession one that has a future or is it in decline?

If you are thinking about studying for a job in a new field, make sure it is one that can survive the economic downturn. Industries expected to get through the recession include:

Health Care
• Education
• Public Safety
• Military
• Accounting


While there should be numerous career opportunities, make sure you conduct due diligence about which direction you want to head.

Taking the Next Steps
Be realistic about which degree and career field you wish to pursue. As you decide which path to follow, consider the following:

Join professional associations. Learn everything there is to know about your prospective field
Conduct research. Study market and industry trends to find out which industries are expected to remain strong in the coming years
Check your finances. Returning to school can be an expensive proposition--understanding where you stand financially can help you make a practical decision about your future
Write down your career goals. Knowing where you want to go professionally can help you create an effective plan for reaching your goals

Returning to school to complete a degree or finish a new degree can be a difficult decision to make. Become informed as possible about your career goals, degree you wish to pursue, and the amount of time it will take you to finish your degree. By being prepared, you should be able to make a focused decision about your future career path.

About the Author:

Edu411.org is a career education directory for finding colleges and universities, training schools, and technical institutes. For more information about careers, online education and campus based career programs, please visit us at http://www.edu411.org">www.Edu411.org" target="_blank">www.Edu411.org">http://www.edu411.org">www.Edu411.org.

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - Out On The Pavement? Could Be Good Time To Hit The Books


Nailing The Interview: Six Ways To Make A Good Impression
Date created: 24/08/2009

Nailing The Interview: Six Ways To Make A Good Impression

Author: Kelli Smith

In a slow economy, every job interview can be a precious opportunity. Whatever your qualifications, assume there are other strong candidates competing for the same job. If you've been called in for an interview, then congratulations--it typically means you've at least made the short list based on how your background looks on paper. Whether or not you get the job, however, may depend on the impression you make in person.

Interviewing well is a form of performance. You have to prepare, and you have to put your full energy and attention into it when the time comes.

Interviewing Takes Preparation
Here are six ways you can make the most out of every interviewing opportunity:

1. Be prepared. Doing well in an interview starts before your actual appointment. Do some research on the company in advance, and try to anticipate likely questions. Run through ways of answering those questions in a positive and honest way. Know what the company dress code is so you can wear something appropriate--and when in doubt, wear a suit. It's usually better to err on the side of seeming more professional rather than too casual. Most important of all, be on time. Work out the logistics of transportation, parking, and potential hold-ups like security check-ins in advance. Aim to arrive five or ten minutes early, so you can use the rest room to give your appearance one last check before meeting the interviewer.

2. Be friendly, but professional. Be sure to treat everyone you meet, including receptionists and assistants, with respect. This means being friendly and polite, but not too informal, chummy, or especially, flirtatious. You never know whose opinions get listened to once you've left the building. When it comes time to meet the interviewer, smile, make eye contact, and shake hands firmly but not aggressively. Observe small courtesies like not sitting down until the interviewer does. Throughout the interview, don't let your eyes wander around the room too much, and sit up in a manner that reflects energy and attentiveness.

3. Take cues from the interviewer. In addition to paying attention to what the interviewer says, pay attention to how he or she acts. Some people's interviewing style is more informal than others, and you should follow suit--though never get drawn into loosening up too much. Also, if the interviewer seems pressed for time, be sure to give concise answers and don't interject more than is necessary.

4. Ask the right questions. You should ask questions that demonstrate a serious interest in the job. That's where some of that advance preparation can come in--you can demonstrate some familiarity with the company in the questions you ask. Those questions should be about the nature of the business and how the area for which you are interviewing operates. Do not ask questions about pay and benefits--that's a discussion you should have when and if you are offered the job. In particular, try to avoid asking about vacation time during the interview. It can create a bad impression when you haven't even started to work and already your mind is on taking a vacation.

5. Structure your answers. Be careful not to ramble. Give concise answers with a clear, strong conclusion. This can show an organized mind, and leave the interviewer no doubt about what your answers were.

6. Make a strong close. When it's time to wrap up, thank the interviewer for the meeting and say something complimentary about the company. Finally, shake hands, make eye contact, and state that you really hope to have the opportunity to work for the company. Even if you are ambivalent about the job, close with an expression of interest. You can always decide to turn the job down later, but until then you should do everything you can to put that decision in your hands. Besides, creating a good impression always pays off--it is how you can start to build your professional reputation.

About the Author:

Edu411.org is a career education directory for finding colleges and universities, training schools, and technical institutes. For more information about careers, online education and campus based career programs, please visit us at http://www.edu411.org">www.Edu411.org" target="_blank">www.Edu411.org">http://www.edu411.org">www.Edu411.org.

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - Nailing The Interview: Six Ways To Make A Good Impression


The Business Case For Diversity
Date created: 24/08/2009

The Business Case For Diversity

Author: Stephen Campbell

Often within organizations the question is asked (by varying sections of the workforce) "why are we bothering with Diversity"? The point being, "things have not been so bad up until this point so why divert time, energy and money into this thing called Diversity which only seems to be in existence to help certain sections of the workforce" and often can be interpreted as acting as a career progression disadvantage to the employees who come from the dominant sections of the workforce. Today more that ever there is a need to establish the business case for Diversity and to ensure that the message is passed down throughout al levels of the organization.

It is fair to say that Diversity is often greeted with a certain amount of skepticism and doubt, is normally 'owned' by the Human Resources department whose task it is to ensure that Diversity is implemented throughout the organization. In some cases the individuals with the Human Resources who are tasked with rolling out the program may not be fully up to speed with Diversity themselves and with the root cause as to why it is essential in today business landscape to have a coherent Diversity program which is understood by all within the organization.

This is where establishing the business case for Diversity comes into play, it moves the emotional aspect out of focus and gives employees the 'real reason why it is so important for their organization to have a coherent Diversity strategy in place i.e. it is down to the effect on the bottom line business results as the company continually strives to establish its competitive advantage over and against the other companies operating in the same market space.

Diversity is not just a "Feel Good Issue" in fact it may be more of a correct statement to classify Diversity as "A Critical Business Issue" i.e. there is a compelling business case for diversity. Today's customers have a choice in purchasing products and services and; with the internet enable world that choice is becoming more and more global on a daily basis. In fact, companies who want to be the winners in their market space and particularly those who want to be big winners, simply cannot afford to practice and conduct business with policies of exclusion in existence.

The companies who want to succeed are the ones who take Diversity beyond the Human Resources department and make it a part of the fabric of the everyday business transactions. These companies take Diversity to a level where they become role models to other companies in terms of inclusion as they welcome employees with different styles, different perspectives, different ideas, different passports, different accents and different skin colors into all levels of the business. These employees are welcomed and are used to make decisions, develop products, engage with customers as a matter of course based upon their skill set.

As companies deliver their products and services to wider and wider profile of target customers it is imperative that more minorities, people of color and women are encouraged to be part of organizations and importantly are seen to be operating throughout their chosen organization at all levels.

The companies which innovate and reinvent themselves on a continuous basis are the companies which will retain their competitive advantage in the market place. Invention and innovation requires creativity and creativity requires true diversity.

Indeed the message that needs to be propagated throughout the organization is one that creativity is driven by true Diversity and, in turn creativity is the main driving force behind innovation and invention. It is this innovation and invention which enable companies to maintain their competitive advantage, this advantage drives profitability and this profitability continually establishes the business case for Diversity.

About the Author:

Stephen C Campbell (MBA, MSc, MCIM) has worked on diversity programs throughout Europe, Far East & U.S. He runs a Business Consultancy and has a keen interest in working with corporations on the link between Diversity and Marketing. http://www.StephenCCampbell.Com

Article Source: ArticlesBase.com - The Business Case For Diversity


The Reality About Online Job Postings
Date created: 06/08/2009
The Reality About Online Job Postings

Contrary to what you may hear from the major job boards, looking for a job purely online is not the best approach.  Research shows that the best strategy is to utilize a variety of tactics to search for a job.  Think of it as a net, and the bigger the net the more likely you are to catch a fish.

I remember doing one of my first job hunts where I only applied to online job postings, and after sending out hundreds of applications/emails I did not get even one single interview!  

The reality is that often by the time a job vacancy makes it online, it is already filled internally or with someone who the hiring manager knows, and they are merely posting the job to fulfill HR requirements.  Note that I say “often,” and not “always.”  Applying to online postings are definitely a tactic that MUST be utilized, but not exclusively.  As I mentioned above, the best strategy is to use multiple tactics, such as online searches, online networking, offline networking, career fairs, or informational interviews.

By far, the tactic that outperforms all others is offline networking.  There are several reasons for this:

1.By meeting face-to-face, you cease to be merely another paper resume.  While the Internet has made distance less important, it does not diminish the importance of actually meeting and speaking with someone.  “Face time” is your opportunity to demonstrate your confidence, knowledge of the field, and much nonverbal information as well.

2.Hiring managers can also better gauge if you'll fit into the company culture, something that can make the difference between a successful hire or a washout.

3.They are human after all, so if they like you it is more likely they'll consider you for the job (assuming you have the qualifications), or even consider you for positions that are not yet posted!

4.Even if you aren't meeting the hiring manager, you will meet and impress people who know hiring managers.  They can then pass your information along to others, so the more people you impress the more likely your resume or contact info will get to a hiring manager looking for someone like you.

So hone your appearance and people skills, and make networking the cornerstone of your job search.  Identify any deficiencies and correct them.  One way to do this is by recording yourself (audio or video) and practicing your pitch.

While networking is the best tactic, you shouldn't put all your eggs in one basket.  Make sure you are casting the widest net possible, because you never know where you'll find that job you're looking for.  Lastly, keep in mind that a job search is not a success until you get the job, so keep at it and use all the resources at your disposal.

R. Griego
Manager
www.2Trabajo.com

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